Tuesday, August 20, 2013

CELEBRATING A TIGHT FIT from the New York Times, August 2


  
The New York Times
August 2, 2013
Augusta Auction Company
New shows are featuring corsets, like this silk boned one from the late 19th century.

CELEBRATING A TIGHT FIT
(this section placed half way down the page)

Antique corsets survive in surprising numbers, and scholars, curators and collectors are scrutinizing them.
Exhibitions at the Musée des Arts Décoratifs in Paris and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art have surveyed the topic, and the Victoria and Albert Museum in London has organized a traveling show, “Undressed: 350 Years of Underwear in Fashion.” In Manhattan, vintage corsetry has gone on view with bloomers and stockings in bedrooms at the Morris-Jumel Mansion and the Merchant’s House Museum.
Auction prices for the torso-constricting pieces, especially for those in bright colors, have reached the high four figures.
“People are fascinated by body shaping, by what goes on under the garment,” said Karen Augusta, a couture historian and auction house owner. She will be bringing corsets and attachable skirt bustle contraptions to a November sale at her business, Augusta Auctions, in Manhattan. She added, “A lot of it is considered erotic, which brings out the crowds.”
Melanie Talkington, a corset dealer and collector in Vancouver, British Columbia, who has lent about 40 pieces to the current Paris show, said in a phone interview that she keeps learning more about the field. This summer, she has been poring through British manufacturer and museum archives. She owns more than 230 corsets and plans to create a museum for them in Vancouver.
She is protective of the fragile clothing; she installed her Paris loans herself, and she discourages anyone tempted to wear vintage pieces.
“It breaks my heart to see them get destroyed,” she said.
Informed corset collectors instead strap on reproductions, loosening the lacings somewhat at bedtime.
“I loved the soft feeling of being hugged all day,” Sarah A. Chrisman, a writer and massage therapist in Port Townsend, Wash., writes in a book due out this fall, “Victorian Secrets: What a Corset Taught Me about the Past, the Present, and Myself” (Skyhorse Publishing).
The corset has long been unfairly maligned, Ms. Chrisman said in a phone interview. Dr. John Harvey Kellogg, a 19th-century cereal magnate and health proselytizer, set off a widespread anti-corset movement by describing the garments as a “barbarous practice” that caused “painful menstrual derangements.” But he was not quite a reliable denouncer, Ms. Chrisman said, given his other extreme views: he was married but largely celibate, and he called masturbation “a crime doubly abominable.”
She credits corsets for improving women’s posture, diet and self-image. “It’s like a good supportive pair of shoes,” she said.

No comments:

Post a Comment

Tuesday, August 20, 2013

CELEBRATING A TIGHT FIT from the New York Times, August 2


  
The New York Times
August 2, 2013
Augusta Auction Company
New shows are featuring corsets, like this silk boned one from the late 19th century.

CELEBRATING A TIGHT FIT
(this section placed half way down the page)

Antique corsets survive in surprising numbers, and scholars, curators and collectors are scrutinizing them.
Exhibitions at the Musée des Arts Décoratifs in Paris and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art have surveyed the topic, and the Victoria and Albert Museum in London has organized a traveling show, “Undressed: 350 Years of Underwear in Fashion.” In Manhattan, vintage corsetry has gone on view with bloomers and stockings in bedrooms at the Morris-Jumel Mansion and the Merchant’s House Museum.
Auction prices for the torso-constricting pieces, especially for those in bright colors, have reached the high four figures.
“People are fascinated by body shaping, by what goes on under the garment,” said Karen Augusta, a couture historian and auction house owner. She will be bringing corsets and attachable skirt bustle contraptions to a November sale at her business, Augusta Auctions, in Manhattan. She added, “A lot of it is considered erotic, which brings out the crowds.”
Melanie Talkington, a corset dealer and collector in Vancouver, British Columbia, who has lent about 40 pieces to the current Paris show, said in a phone interview that she keeps learning more about the field. This summer, she has been poring through British manufacturer and museum archives. She owns more than 230 corsets and plans to create a museum for them in Vancouver.
She is protective of the fragile clothing; she installed her Paris loans herself, and she discourages anyone tempted to wear vintage pieces.
“It breaks my heart to see them get destroyed,” she said.
Informed corset collectors instead strap on reproductions, loosening the lacings somewhat at bedtime.
“I loved the soft feeling of being hugged all day,” Sarah A. Chrisman, a writer and massage therapist in Port Townsend, Wash., writes in a book due out this fall, “Victorian Secrets: What a Corset Taught Me about the Past, the Present, and Myself” (Skyhorse Publishing).
The corset has long been unfairly maligned, Ms. Chrisman said in a phone interview. Dr. John Harvey Kellogg, a 19th-century cereal magnate and health proselytizer, set off a widespread anti-corset movement by describing the garments as a “barbarous practice” that caused “painful menstrual derangements.” But he was not quite a reliable denouncer, Ms. Chrisman said, given his other extreme views: he was married but largely celibate, and he called masturbation “a crime doubly abominable.”
She credits corsets for improving women’s posture, diet and self-image. “It’s like a good supportive pair of shoes,” she said.

No comments:

Post a Comment